Perfect Shadow by Brent Weeks – Book Review

Perfect Shadow By Brent Weeks

PerfectShadow_cvr300dpiPerfect Shadow is a look into the 700-year-old immortal wetboy we grew to love and admire from Brent Weeks’ Night Angel Trilogy, Acaelus Thorne, a man soon to be remade into Durzo Blint. This novella gives us a glimpse at the man before he became bitter and disillusioned by the mission given to him by his friend, his king, Jorsin Alkestes all those centuries ago.

This book was released long after Night Angel Trilogy first appeared and features spoilers for those books. It’s debatable whether those spoilers are enough to deter you from reading this before Way of Shadows, but it’s enough to merit a mention and as such proceed with caution: Here, there be spoilers.

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Durzo Blint is a man that has lived many lives over many centuries. Often he would be a hero, other times, a simple man trying to live a normal, quiet life. He fellin love and had many wives, sometimes even children. It’s not the callus love of loneliness but rather a true kind of love that is probably the reason he’s still alive nearly seven centuries later.

Its the brutal death of the pregnant wife and young daughter that drives Gaelan Starfire away from his farm and eventually to Cenaria to meet Gwinvere Kirena, the Mistress of Pleasure.

In Cenaria he trains with Scarred Wrable in the ways of the wetboy, eventually killing the other wetboys employees by the Sa’Kage and installing “Momma K” as the new head of the criminal empire. Sharp-eyed readers will see subtle allusions to characters and places from the Night Angel Trilogy – including the butcher Hu Gibbett.

It’s a solid novella that isn’t constrained by telling its multiple narratives in chronological order, instead trusting the reader to be able to follow along.

“I’ve turned my back on my king. Fire pursues me, but emptiness can’t be threatened. Emptiness holds nothing dear. Emptiness knows no fear.”

Concurrently with the thread line involving Durzo Blint’s introduction to the world of the Sa’Kage of Cenaria and the wetboys that inhabit it we get a chance to see Durzo swindle a man from the Society of the Second Sun in order to steal his ka’kari, the red, and its subsequent banishment into the heart of Mt. Tenji, a soon-to-be re-active volcano. It’s at this moment that we also get a glimpse into the far past, the moment Jorsin Alkestes used Curoch to seal the krul around Black Burrow and burn every living thing for miles around.

It’s a poignant look filled with deep, philosophical thoughts concerning the origins and the man we’ve grown to know intimately in the time of the original trilogy and a stark reminder that immortality can weigh heavily on the soul.

“One shadow was different. One shadow stood, defiant, one fist raised, edges perfect, outline crisp – Acaelus’s shadow. The others were dim, washed out. Bleached by a flood of light that had continued even after the men who had cast them were burned away. But through all the fire, one man had stood.”

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Book Synopsis:

shortfiction2“I got a bit of prophecy,” the old assassin said. “Not enough to be useful, you know. Just glimpses. My wife dead, things like that to keep me up late at night. I had this vision that I was going to be killed by forty men, all at once. But now that you’re here, I see they’re all you. Durzo Blint.”

Durzo Blint? Gaelan had never even heard the name.

***

Gaelan Starfire is a farmer, happy to be a husband and a father; a careful, quiet, simple man. He’s also an immortal, peerless in the arts of war. Over the centuries, he’s worn many faces to hide his gift, but he is a man ill-fit for obscurity, and all too often he’s become a hero, his very names passing into legend: Acaelus Thorne, Yric the Black, Hrothan Steelbender, Tal Drakkan, Rebus Nimble. But when Gaelan must take a job hunting down the world’s finest assassins for the beautiful courtesan-and-crimelord Gwinvere Kirena, what he finds may destroy everything he’s ever believed in.

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